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Who Were the Kings of Ancient Mesopotamia?
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Who Were the Kings of Ancient Mesopotamia?

Mesopotamia, the Land Between Two Rivers, was located in present-day Iraq and Syria and was home to one of the most ancient civilizations: the Sumerians. Between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, Sumerian cities such as Ur, Uruk, and Lagash provide some of the earliest evidence of human societies, along with the laws, writing, and agriculture that made them function.

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Child Molester and Serial Killer Westley Allen Dodd

In 1989, Westley Allen Dodd sexually assaulted and killed three boys ages 11, 10 and four. His methods were so heinous, that forensic psychologists dubbed him one of the evilest killers in history. Westley Dodd's Childhood Years Westley Allan Dodd was born in Washington State on July 3, 1961. Dodd grew up in what has been described as a loveless home and was often neglected by his parents in favor of his two younger brothers.
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Common Job Interview Questions for ESL Learners

The first impression you make on the interviewer can decide the rest of the interview. It is important that you introduce yourself, shake hands, and be friendly and polite. The first question is often a "breaking the ice" (establish a rapport) type of question. Don't be surprised if the interviewer asks you something like: How are you today?
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English Verbs - Tense Resources

Learning verb tenses is one of the most important tasks in any language learning. There are a number of resources at the site that will help you learn tense rules, practice using verbs in different tenses, read sample sentences in a variety of tenses, teach tenses in class, and more. For an overview of conjugation of all these tenses, use the tense tables or the visual guide to tenses for reference.
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Frank Furness, The Architect for Philadelphia

Architect Frank Furness (pronounced "furnace") designed some of the most elaborate buildings of America's Gilded Age. Sadly, many of his buildings are now demolished, but you can still find Furness-designed masterpieces throughout his home city of Philadelphia. Elaborate architecture flourished during America's Gilded Age, and Frank Furness designed some of the most flamboyant.
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The Top Learning Resources Self-Studying French

If you don't want to or cannot study French with a tutor, in a class or in immersion, you'll be going it alone. This is known as self-study. There are ways to make self-study effective, but it's essential that you pick the right self-study method for you. After all, you want to spend your time doing something that actually works.
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Xipe Totec: Grisly Aztec God of Fertility and Agriculture

Xipe Totec (pronounced Shee-PAY-toh-teck) was the Aztec god of fertility, abundance, and agricultural renewal, as well as the patron deity of goldsmiths and other craftsmen. Despite that rather calm set of responsibilities, the god's name means "Our Lord with the Flayed Skin" or "Our Lord the Flayed One" and ceremonies celebrating Xipe were closely allied with violence and death.
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Philadelphia University Admissions

Philadelphia University Admissions Overview: Philadelphia University admits around two-thirds of applicants each year, making the school generally accessible to those who apply. Students with good grades and test scores have a good chance of being admitted. Those interested will need to submit an application, transcripts of high school work, SAT or ACT scores, teacher recommendations, and a personal essay.
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Marcus Garvey and His Radical Views

No Marcus Garvey biography would be complete without defining the radical views that made him a threat to the status quo. The life story of the Jamaican-born activist starts well before he came to the United States following World War I when Harlem was an exciting place for African-American culture. Poets like Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen, as well as novelists like Nella Larsen and Zora Neale Hurston, created a vibrant literature that captured the black experience.
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The Proclamation of 1763

At the end of the French and Indian War (1756-1763), France gave much of the Ohio and Mississippi Valley along with Canada to the British. The American colonists were happy with this, hoping to expand into the new territory. In fact, many colonists purchased new land deeds or were granted them as part of their military service.
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Helios - Greek God of the Sun

Definition: Helios is the Greek sun god and the sun itself. He is equated with the Roman Sol . Helios drives a chariot led by four fire-breathing horses across the sky each day. At night he is carried back to his starting place in a great divinely-wrought cup. In Mimnermus (fl. 37th Olympiad; Ionian Greek poet), Helios' vehicle is a winged, golden bed.
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Declare Your Independence From Toxic Fireworks Pollution

It may come as no surprise that the fireworks displays that occur around the U.S. every Fourth of July are still typically propelled by the ignition of gunpowder-a technological innovation that pre-dates the American Revolution. Unfortunately, the fallout from these exhibitions includes a variety of toxic pollutants that rain down on neighborhoods from coast to coast, often in violation of federal Clean Air Act standards.
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Absolute Beginner English Basic Adjectives

When absolute beginner students are able to identify a number of basic objects, that is a good time to introduce some basic adjectives to describe those objects. You will need to have some illustrations of similar objects that look slightly different. It's helpful to have them mounted on the same size of cardstock and have them big enough to show to everyone in the classroom.
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Discussion Questions for Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice is one of the most well-known works by Jane Austen. A classic piece of literature, the ever satiric Jane Austen brings us a love story that is both critical of 19th-century English society and reminds us not to take first impressions too seriously. Still very popular, Pride and Prejudice is a great story to discuss with friends and classmates.
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The Start of the Persian Wars

During the Archaic Age, one group of Greeks pushed another from the mainland, resulting in a sizeable Hellenic population in Ionia (now Asia Minor). Eventually, these uprooted Greeks came under the rule of the Lydians of Asia Minor. In 546, Persian monarchs replaced the Lydians. The Ionian Greeks found Persian rule oppressive and attempted to revolt-with the aid of the mainland Greeks.
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Nylon Synthesis

Nylon is a polymer you can make yourself in the lab. A strand of nylon rope is pulled from the interface between two liquids. The demonstration sometimes is called the 'nylon rope trick' because you can pull a continuous rope of nylon from the liquid indefinitely. Close examination of the rope will reveal that is is a hollow polymer tube.
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Tenzing Norgay

11:30 Am, May 29, 1953. Sherpa Tenzing Norgay and New Zealand's Edmund Hillary step onto the summit of Mount Everest, the world's tallest mountain. First, they shake hands, as proper members of a British mountaineering team, but then Tenzing grabs Hillary in an exuberant hug at the top of the world. They linger only about 15 minutes.
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What Motivated Japanese Aggression in World War II?

In the 1930s and 1940s, Japan seemed intent on colonizing all of Asia. It seized vast swathes of land and numerous islands; Korea was already under its control, but it added Manchuria, coastal China, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Singapore, Thailand, New Guinea, Brunei, Taiwan, and Malaya (now Malaysia).
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How to Keep a Lab Notebook

A lab notebook is the primary permanent record of your research and experiments. Note that if you are taking an AP Placement lab course, you need to present a suitable lab notebook in order to get AP credit at most colleges and universities. Here is a list of guidelines that explains how to keep a lab notebook.
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Sacbe, the Ancient Maya Road System

A sacbe (sometimes spelled zac be and pluralized as sacbeob or zac beob) is the Mayan word for the linear architectural features connecting communities throughout the Maya world. Sacbeob functioned as roads, walkways, causeways, property lines, and dikes. The word sacbe translates to "stone road" or "white road" but clearly sacbeob had layers of additional meanings to the Maya, as mythological routes, pilgrimage pathways, and concrete markers of political or symbolic connections between city centers.
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Washington College Admissions

Only around half of those who apply to Washington College are accepted. Learn more about the admissions requirements and what it takes to go to this college. About Washington College Founded in 1782 under the patronage of George Washington, Washington College has a long and rich history. The college was recently awarded a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa for its many strengths in the liberal arts and sciences.
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