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Timeline of the Ancient Rulers of Persia (Modern Iran)

In ancient history, there were 3 main dynasties that controlled ancient Persia, a western name for the area that is modern Iran: Achaemenids, Parthians, and Sasanids. There was also a period when the Hellenistic Macedonian and Greek successors of Alexander the Great, known as Seleucids, ruled Persia.
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The History and Culture of Pirate Ships

During the so-called "Golden Age" of piracy (roughly 1700-1725), thousands of pirates terrorized shipping lanes all over the world, particularly in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. These ruthless men (and women) needed good ships to be able to run down their prey and escape from pirate hunters and navy vessels.
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The History of the Telescope and Binoculars

Phoenicians cooking on sand first discovered glass around 3500 BCE, but it took another 5,000 years or so before glass was shaped into a lens to create the first telescope. Hans Lippershey of Holland is often credited with the invention sometime in the 16 th century. He almost certainly wasn't the first to make one, but he was the first to make the new device widely known.
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Discover Ideas Through Brainstorming

In composition, brainstorming is an invention and discovery strategy in which the writer collaborates with others to explore topics, develop ideas, and/or propose solutions to a problem. Business Dictionary says that brainstorming is the "process for generating creative ideas and solutions through intensive and freewheeling group discussion.
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Life

Cockroaches, Order Blattodea

The order Blattodea includes the cockroaches, insects unfairly reviled the world over. Though some are pests, most cockroach species fill important ecological roles as scavengers that clean up organic waste. The order name comes from blatta , which is Latin for cockroach. Description Cockroaches are ancient insects.
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How Room-Temperature Superconductivity Could Change the World

Imagine a world in which magnetic levitation (maglev) trains are commonplace, computers are lightning-fast, power cables have little loss, and new particle detectors exist. This is the world in which room-temperature superconductors are a reality. So far, this is a dream of the future, but scientists are closer than ever to achieving room-temperature superconductivity.
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